Posted in book tag

Harry Potter Spells Book Tag

I was tagged by Duskangelreads to participate in a Harry Potter book tag. Who can resist Harry Potter?? I can’t! This tag was originally created by kimberlyfayereads and the scroll images belong to the creator. Here we go!

accio

1. An upcoming release you wish you could get your hands on right now

Dark in Death

alohomora

2. Favorite Series Starter

one for the money

cheering-charm

3. A book that gave you all the warm fuzzies

everything everything

aguamenti

4. The book that made you ugly cry

eleanor and park

expecto-patronum

5. Bookish hero & heroine you want around to protect you in real life

books and braun

lumos

6. A book you intentionally spoiled for yourself

Who does this?!?!?!? And why???

imperio

7. A book you wish you could make everyone read because you loved it so much.

See answers 2, 3, & 4.

engorgio

8. A book or series you wish never ended.

Harry Potter

wingardium-leviosa

9. A book with an uplifting ending or message

heart shaped box

obliviate

10. A book you wish you could forget you ever read

girl on the train

anapneo

11. An author whose books always get you out of a slump

J.D. Robb or J.K. Rowling.

jelly-legs-jinx

12. A swoon-worthy hero or heroine

outlander

Jamie Fraser

aresto-momentum

13. A book that caused you to stop doing all other things until you finished it.

Eleanor & Park, Fangirl, Everything, Everything, and The Sun is Also a Star

14-crucio

14. A book that was painful to read (for whatever reason) or broke you

Any of the Outlander series. They are wonderfully written but some of the scenes are hard to get through because of the subject matter. When I reread them, I skim over those parts and on the TV series, I fastforward, lol.

rictumsempra

15. A book that had you laughing out loud

The Stephanie Plum series by Janet Evanovich. I laugh so hard at those books that I can’t read them in bed because I wake up my husband, who has slept through an earthquake before, btw.

expelliarmus

16. A book that made you want to send it (or your eReader) flying

See answer #10. That book was beyond awful.

portus

17. A bookish world you wish you could visit

Marie Antoinette

I’d want to try and save Marie, Louis, and their children.

stupefy

18. A book with a shocking twist or ending

I couldn’t come up with an answer to this one.

avadakedavra

19. A character death that destroyed you

I couldn’t come up with an answer for this one either. I tend to stay away from books about death or dying or books that would make me want to curl up in a ball and cry.

finite-incantatem

20. Best series conclusion

I feel like it’s kinda cliche and an easy answer, but it’s true nonetheless, Harry Potter.

I’m going to take a page out of duskangelreads’ book (haha) and tag the 2 people who have followed me recently (sorta recently).

FNM

A Book. A Thought.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements
Posted in Community

2017 Dewey’s Readathon

There-is-no-friend-as-loyal-as-a-book-Ernest-Hemingway-book-quoteI’m prepped and ready to begin the readathon this year. This is my third year!!! I have a stack of graphic novels to break up the reading of longer books. New to me this year, I’ve included a few poetry books as well. I think I’m prepared with snacks as well, but I usually underestimate that end of things.

What I love about this marathon is that it keeps Dewey’s memory alive. I was not acquainted with her but only learned of her through the challenge, so I think the organizers and her friends should be applauded for efforts well-made. If I had a legacy after my passing, I would love for it to have something to do with books and literacy. I also love that I have an entire day of reading scheduled into my year and thus, I do so without the guilt of neglecting the non-reading world around me, lol.

Are you participating this year? Have you in years past? What do you love most about it?

Posted in Community, meme, Weekly Reading

Mid-Week Update 9/27/16

I’ve had a busy week, so far, when it comes to reading. I had a few unexpected requests come in from Net Galley, which has made me switch up my reading list just a smidge. We’ll start out with What Are You Reading Wednesdays hosted by It’s a Reading Thing and go from there.

whatareyoureadingwed

Grab the book you are currently reading and answer three questions:
1. What’s the name of your current read?
2. Go to page 34 in your book or 34% in your eBook and share a couple of sentences.
3. Would you like to live in the world that exists within your book? Why or why not?

I’m currently reading Sepulcher (every time I type that word into WP, it highlights it as being misspelled even though it’s not) by Kate Mosse. At page 34 we have:

Anatole smiled. “Ah, but that is precisely the point. Debussy says that one must drown the sense of key. He is seeking to illuminate, through his music, the connections between the material and the spiritual worlds, the seen and the unseen, and such a thing cannot be presented in the traditional ways.”

Leonie pulled a face. “That sounds like one of those clever things people say that mean precisely nothing!”

I love that this passage is on page 34 because I laughed when I first read it. I get irritated at the same thing that Leonie does here.

This book takes place mostly in France (From what I can tell so far. I’m only on page 75.) but it switches back in forth in time from 1891 to 2007. I wouldn’t mind living in France in either of these times, but I’d probably prefer 1891…at least until WWI started.

shelf-control

Next is Shelf Control hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

The rules for this meme:  Write a blog post about a book you already own but haven’t read yet. Include when and where you got it.

brave-new-world
Don’tcha love this cover?

I am picking Brave New World by Aldous Huxley this week because it’s an ALA challenged book and I’m going to do my best to actually read it sometime this week, lol. We’ll see how it goes. I bought this book at a used book store but I’m drawing a blank on which one and I have absolutely no memory of when. I want to say it’s been at least a year if not two but definitely less than four, lmao!!

Blurb:

Aldous Huxley is rightly considered a prophetic genius and one of the most important literary and philosophical voices of the 20th Century, and Brave New World is his masterpiece. From the author of The Doors of Perception, Island, and countless other works of fiction, non-fiction, philosophy, and poetry, comes this powerful work of speculative fiction that has enthralled and terrified readers for generations. Brave New World remains absolutely relevant to this day as both a cautionary dystopian tale in the vein of the George Orwell classic 1984, and as thought-provoking, thoroughly satisfying entertainment.

This article from the Washington Post on why this book has been challenged is hilarious. When I bought it, I didn’t know it was a challenged book. I bought it because it was a dystopian novel written in 1932 and I wanted to compare it to dystopian novels written more recently. Now, I’ll read it with the reasoning behind the challenges in mind.

 

Posted in Community, meme, TBR

Top Ten Tuesday: Fall TBR

toptentuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.

This week’s prompt is Books on My Fall TBR.

Hopefully making this list doesn’t automatically doom me to not reading these books as making lists so often does. It’s a really weird quirk of mine.

  1. The Sepulcher by Kate Mosse. This is the print book that I’m currently reading. It had been sitting on my shelf for quite some time and I decided to give it a go.
  2. The Heretic’s Creed by Fiona Buckley. This is my current eBook that I’m reading from Netgalley.
  3. To Capture What We Cannot Keep by Beatrice Colin. This is next up from Netgalley.
  4. ODY-C, Vol 1 – Off to Far Ithicaa by Matt Fraction and Christian Ward. This is a graphic novel that I plan on reading for Dewey’s Read-a-thon next month.
  5. Saga, Vol. 6 by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples. Another graphic novel I plan on reading for Dewey’s.
  6. Rogues edited by George R. R. Martin and Gardner R. Dozois. This is a collection of short stories by authors like Neil Gaiman and Gillian Flynn.
  7. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. This is an ALA challenged book that I’ve been wanting to read for a while. No time like the present.
  8. The Mathematician’s Shiva by Stuart Rojstaczer. This is another book that’s been sitting on my shelf for at least a year. Recently, it’s been catching my eye as I walk by. I think it’s calling out to me, lol. 

There are plenty more books that I’ll read between now and the winter solstice, but I’m not sure what they are at present. I have a list of “need to buy” books that I’d love to read asap, but with Christmas right around the corner, I’m not sure how many of them I’ll pick up. Actually, I have 74 unread books currently sitting on my shelves so I have plenty to choose from. Why is it that we continue to buy books to read when our physical TBR pile is so tall??? 😉

So tell me, what’s on your Fall TBR? Anything you’d recommend?

Posted in Community

The Ratings Pressure

5 Hearts
I recently watched a booktube vid on YouTube about the positive and/or negative aspects of rating books. The video is Goodreads Ratings:  Yay or Nay? by suddenlylorna, who I love and you should check out. I’ve touched on this subject in the past but from a different perspective and I’d like to revisit it today.

I rate books on Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and here on my blog. I do so for several reasons.

  1. A rating gives an instant and brief glimpse into my feelings about a book. This is useful to me, personally, because it helps jog my memory about how I initially felt about a book. I think this is helpful to other readers too, to give them a starting place upon which to decide if they want to read a book or not.
  2. It’s easy. I do my very best to write about my feelings on books that I’ve read but sometimes, especially if the book is older, I don’t always take the time. A rating takes the place of a drawn out review and/or journal entry.
  3. A rating is less opinionated.

I can see suddenlylorna’s point about no longer wanting to rate books on GR though. She said she feels pressure to rate a book in her mind, as she’s reading it before she even finishes a book. I’m sure other readers feel the same pressure. In my mind or in a notebook, I am taking notes on what I am liking or disliking about the book as I’m reading it. I’m not assigning it a rating though. I also don’t give in to the pressure to agree with the majority. If I rate a book, its rating is coming from my experience with the book, not other people’s. This is controversial, but I’ve seen GR users gang up together to attack authors and/or books. These so-called “influencers” can severely hurt a book’s rating. This reason alone is enough to base your opinions on a book on what you take away from it, not what other people are telling you is good or bad about a book.

Ratings and opinions are subjective. The book I reviewed on Monday was given a wide range of ratings on GR. I gave it a middle rating of 3 but I could see why other people only rated it 1 star. The things that bugged me about the book bugged them even more. That’s their opinion and it isn’t right or wrong just like my opinion isn’t right or wrong. I can think of one specific book that bugged the ever living hell out of me. I can’t, not for one millisecond, see why so many people liked it. Still, it has been made into a movie and is ever so popular. Who cares? I can live with being in the minority.

Why don’t we, as a book reading society, allow ourselves to have opinions? I remember reading someone’s blog or an article or something, where someone said it’s rude to post a negative opinion about a book. Maybe it was in a Facebook group. I think it’s actually against the rules to debate about why they (the member(s)) didn’t like a specific book. Anyway, wow! Not every book published is actually good. Not every book that has received critical acclaim is good. Not every book adapted into a movie is good.

It amazes me how much pressure we put on ourselves. Allow yourself to have an opinion on your books! Of equal importance, allow others to have opinions too even if they don’t agree with yours! The world would be a boring place if we all thought the exact same things.

Posted in Community

Top Ten Tuesday: Fave Books

This is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.

toptentuesday

This week’s topic is Top Ten ALL TIME Favorite Books Of X Genre. I don’t like this kind of pressure. So, I’m adding a caveat to mine to say these are books that I really like in the historical fiction genre at this moment in time. I’m not listing them in any particular order either because that’s too much pressure.

  1. Outlander by Diana Gabaldon.
  2. The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore
  3. All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
  4. Madame Tussaud:  A Novel of the French Revolution by Michelle Moran
  5. Becoming Marie Antoinette by Juliet Grey
  6. Fall of Giants by Ken Follett
  7. The Lady Elizabeth by Alison Weir
  8. Abundance by Sena Jeter Naslund
  9. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain
  10. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

For some of my picks, I only listed the first book in a series. I could have filled my list with books by just one or two authors because they’ve written so many books in a series, but I wanted my list to be more diverse.

Posted in Community

Top Ten Tuesday: Back To School

This is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.

toptentuesday

This week’s topic is:  Back To School Freebie — anything “back to school” related. For mine, I’m posting the Top Ten Books for Every High School Kid, but in no particular order.

  1. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. Every student should have to read this book from an analytical point of view. Talk about the themes as they pertain to the time in which it was written and Twain’s life.
  2. CarmillaCarmilla by J. Sheridan Le Fanu. I remember trying to get through Dracula by Bram Stoker in high school and slogging through every page. Carmilla should be read, in my opinion, before Dracula because 1.) It’s the definitive and basic tale of vampires and 2.) It’s shorter and easier to read. I was turned off by Dracula for about ten years before I read it in college and loved it. I now consider it one of my favorite books.
  3. Something from the Lost Generation and please, let’s skip The Great Gastby for pete’s sake. I’d personally pick something from Hemingway like The Old Man and the Sea or A Farewell to Arms or my personal favorite, A Moveable Feast. There are so many great novels by any of the Lost Generation authors that it doesn’t always have to be Gatsby.
  4. HurstonTheir Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. Gosh! I loved this novel. I think it’s more important to learn about this author, her life, and all the things she said and believed than it would be to read her novels, but the novel is a great place to start.
  5. Poe’s collected works. Haha. Joking. But more than just The Raven. It seems like that’s all that’s ever assigned. Memorize the freaking Raven. How about The Cask of Amontillado? Or The Black Cat? Poe was a prolific writer. Pick something out of the ordinary.
  6. , 7., 8., 9., & 10.  Writing guidebooks. The APA should be one of them. High school students are sent off to college and out into the world without the proper tools and knowledge for writing. I have papers and statistics for this, but I’m too lazy to find them on my computer. College certainly isn’t for everyone, but chances are, you are going to run across at least one instance in your life where you have to write something on a professional level; you should know what you’re doing. Also, a book on how to read critically should be one of the five.