Posted in Community, meme, Weekly Reading

Mid-Week Update 9/27/16

I’ve had a busy week, so far, when it comes to reading. I had a few unexpected requests come in from Net Galley, which has made me switch up my reading list just a smidge. We’ll start out with What Are You Reading Wednesdays hosted by It’s a Reading Thing and go from there.

whatareyoureadingwed

Grab the book you are currently reading and answer three questions:
1. What’s the name of your current read?
2. Go to page 34 in your book or 34% in your eBook and share a couple of sentences.
3. Would you like to live in the world that exists within your book? Why or why not?

I’m currently reading Sepulcher (every time I type that word into WP, it highlights it as being misspelled even though it’s not) by Kate Mosse. At page 34 we have:

Anatole smiled. “Ah, but that is precisely the point. Debussy says that one must drown the sense of key. He is seeking to illuminate, through his music, the connections between the material and the spiritual worlds, the seen and the unseen, and such a thing cannot be presented in the traditional ways.”

Leonie pulled a face. “That sounds like one of those clever things people say that mean precisely nothing!”

I love that this passage is on page 34 because I laughed when I first read it. I get irritated at the same thing that Leonie does here.

This book takes place mostly in France (From what I can tell so far. I’m only on page 75.) but it switches back in forth in time from 1891 to 2007. I wouldn’t mind living in France in either of these times, but I’d probably prefer 1891…at least until WWI started.

shelf-control

Next is Shelf Control hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

The rules for this meme:  Write a blog post about a book you already own but haven’t read yet. Include when and where you got it.

brave-new-world
Don’tcha love this cover?

I am picking Brave New World by Aldous Huxley this week because it’s an ALA challenged book and I’m going to do my best to actually read it sometime this week, lol. We’ll see how it goes. I bought this book at a used book store but I’m drawing a blank on which one and I have absolutely no memory of when. I want to say it’s been at least a year if not two but definitely less than four, lmao!!

Blurb:

Aldous Huxley is rightly considered a prophetic genius and one of the most important literary and philosophical voices of the 20th Century, and Brave New World is his masterpiece. From the author of The Doors of Perception, Island, and countless other works of fiction, non-fiction, philosophy, and poetry, comes this powerful work of speculative fiction that has enthralled and terrified readers for generations. Brave New World remains absolutely relevant to this day as both a cautionary dystopian tale in the vein of the George Orwell classic 1984, and as thought-provoking, thoroughly satisfying entertainment.

This article from the Washington Post on why this book has been challenged is hilarious. When I bought it, I didn’t know it was a challenged book. I bought it because it was a dystopian novel written in 1932 and I wanted to compare it to dystopian novels written more recently. Now, I’ll read it with the reasoning behind the challenges in mind.

 

Posted in Community, meme, TBR

Top Ten Tuesday: Fall TBR

toptentuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.

This week’s prompt is Books on My Fall TBR.

Hopefully making this list doesn’t automatically doom me to not reading these books as making lists so often does. It’s a really weird quirk of mine.

  1. The Sepulcher by Kate Mosse. This is the print book that I’m currently reading. It had been sitting on my shelf for quite some time and I decided to give it a go.
  2. The Heretic’s Creed by Fiona Buckley. This is my current eBook that I’m reading from Netgalley.
  3. To Capture What We Cannot Keep by Beatrice Colin. This is next up from Netgalley.
  4. ODY-C, Vol 1 – Off to Far Ithicaa by Matt Fraction and Christian Ward. This is a graphic novel that I plan on reading for Dewey’s Read-a-thon next month.
  5. Saga, Vol. 6 by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples. Another graphic novel I plan on reading for Dewey’s.
  6. Rogues edited by George R. R. Martin and Gardner R. Dozois. This is a collection of short stories by authors like Neil Gaiman and Gillian Flynn.
  7. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. This is an ALA challenged book that I’ve been wanting to read for a while. No time like the present.
  8. The Mathematician’s Shiva by Stuart Rojstaczer. This is another book that’s been sitting on my shelf for at least a year. Recently, it’s been catching my eye as I walk by. I think it’s calling out to me, lol. 

There are plenty more books that I’ll read between now and the winter solstice, but I’m not sure what they are at present. I have a list of “need to buy” books that I’d love to read asap, but with Christmas right around the corner, I’m not sure how many of them I’ll pick up. Actually, I have 74 unread books currently sitting on my shelves so I have plenty to choose from. Why is it that we continue to buy books to read when our physical TBR pile is so tall??? 😉

So tell me, what’s on your Fall TBR? Anything you’d recommend?

Posted in Community, meme

Mid-Week Update

Just giving a brief update as to what I’m reading or planning on reading via a couple bookish memes.

whatareyoureadingwed

First up, What Are You Reading Wednesdays hosted by It’s a Reading Thing.

Grab the book you are currently reading and answer three questions:
1. What’s the name of your current read?
2. Go to page 34 in your book or 34% in your eBook and share a couple of sentences.
3. Would you like to live in the world that exists within your book? Why or why not?

Funnily enough, I started my current read last week after writing up the Shelf Control meme. It sounded so good to me, that I just couldn’t put it off another day. I’m currently reading The Affinity Bridge by George Mann. From page 34:

“This bruising suggests the victim was grabbed forcefully around the throat and struggled somewhat before finally being despatched. There’s nothing of the perpetrator left at the scene, but it certainly matches the profile of the other killings.”

Based on this passage, I wouldn’t choose to live in this world. Seems awfully dangerous. However, in general, I would love the chance to live in a steampunk version of Victorian England. It’s a time in history that I find vastly interesting and it’d be enhanced with steampunk inventions.

shelf-control

My book for this week’s Shelf Control is Carry On by Rainbow Rowell.

Blurb:

Simon Snow is the worst chosen one who’s ever been chosen.

That’s what his roommate, Baz, says. And Baz might be evil and a vampire and a complete git, but he’s probably right.

Half the time, Simon can’t even make his wand work, and the other half, he sets something on fire. His mentor’s avoiding him, his girlfriend broke up with him, and there’s a magic-eating monster running around wearing Simon’s face. Baz would be having a field day with all this, if he were here—it’s their last year at the Watford School of Magicks, and Simon’s infuriating nemesis didn’t even bother to show up.

Carry On is a ghost story, a love story, a mystery and a melodrama. It has just as much kissing and talking as you’d expect from a Rainbow Rowell story—but far, far more monsters.

I bought this book at Barnes & Noble somewhere around June 2015. Honestly, I bought it because it’s a Rainbow Rowell book and because it’s a signed copy. If you’re familiar with Rowell’s books, you know that Carry On was taken from her Fangirl novel. In Fangirl, the main character is obsessed with a Harry Potter-like series of books and there were quite a few passages (that I skimmed more than read.) taken from those “books” and quoted in Fangirl. So, Rowell took those fictional characters from within a fictional world and wrote Carry On as its own story. From the very first, I thought that Simon and Baz’s world sounded too much like a spin off of Harry Potter’s world and it doesn’t sound too original. As such, I really don’t have any plans on actually reading this book. It was more of a buy for collecting reasons than because I’m interested in the story. Who knows though? Someday…

 

 

Posted in Community

Top Ten Tuesday: Fave Books

This is a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish.

toptentuesday

This week’s topic is Top Ten ALL TIME Favorite Books Of X Genre. I don’t like this kind of pressure. So, I’m adding a caveat to mine to say these are books that I really like in the historical fiction genre at this moment in time. I’m not listing them in any particular order either because that’s too much pressure.

  1. Outlander by Diana Gabaldon.
  2. The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore
  3. All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
  4. Madame Tussaud:  A Novel of the French Revolution by Michelle Moran
  5. Becoming Marie Antoinette by Juliet Grey
  6. Fall of Giants by Ken Follett
  7. The Lady Elizabeth by Alison Weir
  8. Abundance by Sena Jeter Naslund
  9. The Paris Wife by Paula McLain
  10. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

For some of my picks, I only listed the first book in a series. I could have filled my list with books by just one or two authors because they’ve written so many books in a series, but I wanted my list to be more diverse.

Posted in book tag, Community, Fun Bookishness

Pokemon Go Book Tag

I saw this floating around the blogosphere and tracked it back to its origins at Read at Midnight. I’m not going to tag anyone because I’m coming into this rather late-ish and I don’t know who’s already done it. But feel free to participate if you haven’t already. The graphics can be found on the original post.

pokemon-tag-01starters

I’ve been reading since my earliest memories and don’t recall any of my very first books. In elementary school, however, I couldn’t get enough of Beverly Cleary, Judy Blume, and Nancy Drew books. Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret had such a big influence on me, even now as an adult.

pokemon-tag02pikachu

I’ve read this book so many times. In middle school, high school, and for both my undergrad and graduate school classes. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. I love this book so much that I did an in depth study of it for my last class. I’ve probably written at least three different papers on this book.

pokemon-tag-03-zubat

I can’t think of any book that I lost interest in because of its popularity. I can think of some books that I didn’t read because of hearing about them constantly like anything by John Green, Jojo Moyes, or Liane Moriarty. But I never had any interest in his books to begin with. By the way, this graphic should’ve had the rattata’s instead of the zubats. Those freaking rats are everywhere.

pokemon-tag-04-ditto

Hmm. This for this one, I guess I would say just about any romance that I’ve ever read that I liked. I like romances for their ease of reading and for the escapism aspect, but let’s face it. They’re basically all the same.

pokemon-tag-05-snorlax

There aren’t any series I haven’t started because of how large it is. The bigger, the better I’m thinking.

pokemon-tag06-gengar

So, this one means because it creeped me out and not just because I couldn’t put it down. Honestly, I don’t read a lot of thriller/suspense/horror-type books. I don’t read Stephen King anymore and most books in this genre(s) are cheesy. Please, if you know of one that is well-written, moves at a good pace, and creeped the hell out you, feel free to leave a comment with a rec.

pokemon-tag07-nidokingqueen

I have no answer for this.

pokemon-tag08-rapidash

Any of Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum books. I zip right through these, usually in one sitting because I can’t put them down. They’re face-paced, hilarious, feel-good reads.

pokemon-tag09-eevee

This is a hard one. I can’t think of any series of books that I’ve read that even had spinoffs except for Harry Potter and I refuse to read any of those. I guess J.D. Robb’s In Death series could count because she’s written quite a few novellas for this series and I’ve read most of them. Honestly though, I didn’t really like any of them. Shortened versions of my favorite books are more frustrating than enjoyable.

pokemon-tag14-magikarp

I was pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed the Hunger Games. I didn’t think it’d be my cup of tea. From that, I was definitely shocked that I liked the Divergent series at all because everyone said it was a knockoff of Hunger Games. Not so. I liked and enjoyed both series.

pokemon-tag12-legendary

Oh goodness. I’m not really sure here.

pokemon-tag15mew-mewtwo

There aren’t any collector’s editions of books I wish that I owned. There are, however, first editions of books that I wish I had. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, A Moveable Feast, Lord of the Flies, and a few others.

pokemon-tag10-egg

Ugh! This tag should be easier! I can’t think of anything modern, but I’ve been wanting to read A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

pokemon-tag11-lure-module

I don’t really have auto-buy authors so much as I have auto-buy series. Like Stephanie Plum and In Death. I guess you could say Alison Weir though.

pokemon-tag13-server-down

This is an easy one!! Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series. We, the fans, wait FORever for each book to be released. FORever!! They’re always worth the wait and they’re always long books, but I still read them in a couple days, lol. Seriously though, I think Gabaldon takes the longest of any authors for whom I am a fan, to write books.